Tuesday, June 14, 2005

Bear Necessities

You would expect a state like Colorado to have it's share of bear problems, but who would have thought we would have similar discussions in suburban New Jersey? The dynamic is simple. Bears are territorial. The big bears force younger bears out in ever widening circles to find their own digs. This works great in British Columbia, but not in Jersey. The problem is created by the animal rights activists who are in control of NJ wildlife management. By disallowing a bear hunt, the ever-increasing bear population will continue to follow their normal patterns of behavior, thus placing them in close proximity to us and our kids. To say local authorities are unprepared for the inevitable bear encounters is an understatement. Unfortunately, it will take a tragedy to snap wildlife management out of their PETA-induced stupors. Of course by then, it'll be too late.

~Update~

With residential bear 'encounters' on the rise, it seems the DEP is re-thinking it's position on the annual bear hunt. Lets hope the hunt goes back on the calendar before somebody gets mauled in their own back yard.

~Update~

Well, it looks like we're going bear hunting next season. At least for now. Hats off to Bradley Campbell for having the fortitude to admit he was wrong - but under the circumstances, he didn't have any choice. Sure wish the rest of bureaucratic New Jersey was this easily influenced by facts.

~Update~

By the way, just in case you think black bears are cuddly little honey munching fuzz-balls, this might cause you to reconsider.